Rania Gihleb (Download CV)
270 Bay State Road
Boston MA 02215
Mobile: +1 (617)-671-8066
Email:
rgikhleb@bu.edu
Web site: people.bu.edu/rgikhleb

Current Position
Will join the Department of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh
as Assistant Professor, Fall 2014

Education
Ph.D., Economics, Boston University, Boston MA, May 2014
Dissertation Title:
Female Labor Supply and Assortative Mating
Main Advisor: Claudia Olivetti

M.A., Economics
(with distinction), Tel Aviv University, August 2006. Thesis under the supervision of Zvi Eckstein

B.A., Economics
(with honors), Academic College of Tel Aviv Yaffo, July 2003

Fields of Interest
Labor Economics, Family Economics, Applied Econometrics

Teaching Experience
Teaching Fellow, Principles of Microeconomics, Department of Economics, Boston University, Spring 2012
Teaching Fellow, Principles of Macroeconomics, Department of Economics, Boston University, Fall 2011
Teaching Fellow, Principles of Macroeconomics, Department of Economics, Boston University, Spring 2009
Teaching Fellow, Principles of Microeconomics, Department of Economics, Boston University, Fall 2008
Teaching Assistant, Macroeconomics, Tel Aviv University, Fall 2003-Spring 2005
Teaching Assistant, Microeconomics, Tel Aviv University, Fall 2003-Spring 2005
Teaching Assistant, Macroeconomics, Academic College of Tel Aviv, Fall 2003-Spring 2005
Teaching Assistant, Microeconomics, Academic College of Tel Aviv, Fall 2003-Spring 2005

Fellowships and Awards
Summer Research Grant, Department of Economics, Boston University, Summer 2011
Fellow of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, Boston University, 2007-present
Scholarship/ Award for a one year program from the ADVA center, Tel Aviv, Aug 2006 – August 2007
Award of Alfred Akirov (benefactor of E. Berglas School of Economics, Tel Aviv University), 2006
Merit – based Scholarship from the Academic College of Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv, 2001 – 2003

Work Experience
NBER Research Assistant to Professors Iain Cockburn & Ernst Berndt (May 2012 - present)
NBER Research Assistant to Professors Iain Cockburn & Ernst Berndt (2010-2011)
Research Assistant to Professor Laurence Kotlikoff (June 2009- September 2010)
Manager, KATA Industries, Israel (1999 – 2006)

Working Papers
“Dynamic Effects of Educational Assortative Mating on Labor Supply,” (with Osnat Lifshitz), October 2013.
“Nuns and the Effects of Catholic Schools. Evidence from Vatican II,” (with G. Osea Giuntella), IZA Discussion Paper No. 7753 November 2013.
“Educational Assortative Mating for Blacks and Whites since the 1960s,” January 2013.

Work in Progress
“The Closing of the Gender Gap in Marriage Wage Premium”
“Putting Off Retirement to Keep Being Your Kids’ ATM,” (with Zvika Eckstein and Osnat Lifshitz)
“Marriage of Equals and Inequality”
“A Late Start: The Effects of Generation Y’s Delayed Entry into the Workforce on Generation Z’s Prospects,” (with Osnat Lifshitz)


Conferences & presentations
Society of Labor Economists Meetings (SOLE), Washington D.C., May 2014
Royal Economic Society, Manchester, April 2014

Family Economics and Family Policy Workshop, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW Mannheim), November 2013

North American Summer Meeting of the Econometric Society (NASM), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, June 2013
Royal Economic Society (RES), Royal Holloway, University of London, London, April 2013
European Association of Labour Economists (EALE), Bonn, September 2012
European Society for Population Economics (ESPE), Bern, June 2012
Population Association of America (PAA), 2012 Annual Meeting, San Francisco, May 2012
Association for the Study of Religion, Economics and Culture (ASREC), Orange County, March 2012

Other: Horseback riding, hiking, running


Languages:
English, French, Hebrew, Arabic, Italian (basic)

Computer Skills: STATA, EViews, GAUSS, MATLAB, LATEX, ArcGIS and Excel

Citizenship/Visa: Israel/F1

References

Professor Claudia Olivetti
Department of Economics
Boston University
Phone: (617) 353-4449
Email:
olivetti@bu.edu

Professor Zvi Eckstein
Dean, the School of Economics
The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya- IDC
Phone: (972)-9-960-2431
Email:
zeckstein@idc.ac.il

Professor Kevin Lang
Department of Economics
Boston University
Phone: (617) 353-5694

Email:
lang@bu.edu

Professor M. Daniele Paserman
Department of Economics
Boston University
Phone: (617) 353-5695
Email:
paserman@bu.edu


October 2013


Rania Gihleb



Dynamic Effects of Educational Assortative Mating on Labor Supply (Job Market Paper) (with Osnat Lifshitz)

This paper examines the link between spousal educational gap and the labor supply behavior of married women over the life-cycle. Using data from the 1965-2011 March Current Population study and the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), we document that within married couples, if the wife's education exceeds her husband's (accounting for her demographics, her husband's education, and his income), the wife is substantially more likely to be employed compared to if she is less educated than her husband (up to 14.5 percentage points). We formulate and structurally estimate a dynamic life-cycle model of endogenous marriage and labor supply decisions in a collective framework. We establish that the dependencies between a husband's educational attainment and a wife's labor supply decision, at the time of marriage, produce dynamic effects due to human capital accumulation and implied wage growth. Returns to experience account for 52 percent of the employment gap observed between women who had married ``down'' and those who married ``up''. Counterfactuals also indicate that, alone, the changes in assortative mating patterns across cohorts, which are implied by the changes in the marginal distributions of education, are able to explain a sizable proportion (roughly 25 percent) of the observed rise in married women's labor force participation.


Educational Assortative Mating for Blacks and Whites since the 1960s

Much prior research reports a rise in educational assortative mating. This raised a widely shared concern with short and long run effects of increasing educational sorting on inequality. This paper examines the evolution of educational assortative mating along racial lines. Previous studies, using log linear models, suggest that preferences have changed across cohorts in the US to produce an increase in assortative mating, even after accounting for the changes in the marginal distribution of males and females in each group. Using correlation coefficients, I find that educational assortative mating has been stable over time for blacks and whites despite social and economic changes that might have impacted individual's incentives to form a marriage. Analyzing log odds, I conclude that there were limited increases in the preference for own type for whites but not for blacks. Women marry more down, in particular women with a college degree. Using the proportion of couples who are perfectly matched in terms of educational traits, similar conclusions are drawn for whites but not for blacks. These results cast doubts on the role of assortative mating in the increase in household income inequality in US.


Nuns and the Effects of Catholic Schools. Evidence from Vatican II (with Osea Giuntella)

This paper examines the causal effects of Catholic schooling on educational attainment. Using a novel instrumental-variable approach that exploits an exogenous shock to the Catholic school's system, we show that the positive correlation between Catholic schooling and student outcomes is explained by selection bias. With the universal call to holiness and the opening to lay leadership, the reforms that occurred at the Second Vatican Council produced a dramatic exogenous change in the cost/benefit ratio of religious life in the Catholic Church. The decline of vocations that followed contributed to a significant increase in costs and, in many cases, to the closure of Catholic schools. We document that this decline was heterogeneous across US dioceses and more marked in those dioceses governed by a liberal bishop. Merging diocesan data drawn from the Official Catholic Directory (1960-1980) and the US Census, we show that that the variation in the supply of female religious teachers across US dioceses is strongly related to Catholic schooling. Using the abrupt decline in female vocations as an instrument for Catholic schooling, we find no evidence of positive effects on student outcomes.